NEWS

New York Times Feature

on May 24, 2013 by Neil Tesser

Frank Catalano going strong

on Jan 10, 2013 by Howard Reich

Frank Catalano Cover Story

on Mar 20, 2011 by Dan Ferris and Mike Jeffers

Saxophonist Frank Catalano set to blow away the 2010 Isthmus Jazz Festival

on Jun 03, 2010 by Dean Robbins

Frank Catalano's Reed and Mouthpiece

on Apr 20, 2010 by In Tune Monthly

Geschliffener Sound mit viel Soul

on Mar 22, 2010 by Von Rolf Graff

One Autism Mom's Notes

on Feb 14, 2010 by Pam Byrne

Frank Catalano Tonight

on Feb 13, 2010 by Shepherd Express Staff

Frank Catalano Quartet

on Jan 28, 2010 by A.V. Club Madison

Chit-Chat: Sax man Frank Catalano plays it cool

on Dec 21, 2009 by Renee Tomell

Frank Catalano: My One and Only Love (Review)

on May 01, 2009 by Ted Gioia

BANG! Review

on Oct 01, 2008 by Bill Meredith

Critics Preview

on Oct 03, 2007 by WUMUSICA

Sax in the Suburbs: The Strange –but true story of how Frank Catalano, a globe-trotting saxphone phenom, came to call the North Shore his adopted home.

on Jan 01, 2007 by Amber Holst

A Little Night Music

on Sep 24, 2006 by Where Magazine

Billboard Listing Jul 2006

on Jul 24, 2006 by Billboard Magazine

Chicago saxophonist Frank Catalano grows into his reputation

on Jul 12, 2006 by Howard Reich

Mighty Burner Review

on Jul 05, 2006 by Ron Netsky

Mighty Burner Review

on May 09, 2006 by Mark Corroto

Frank Catalano: Sax Machine Shows Jazz Is Still A Young Man's Game

on Sep 15, 2005 by Michael Austin

Sax Machine

on Apr 24, 2004 by Chicago Magazine

Mighty Burner Review

on May 09, 2006 by Mark Corroto Source:www.allaboutjazz.com

If I were a saxophonist, I certainly would want to be Maceo Parker for a day. Frank catalano Certainly had the long-time James Brown sideman on his mind when he recorded Mighty Burner.

With three fine Delmark hard bop discs under his belt, the twenty-something Chicagoan unleashes this crowd-pleasing live session. He takes no pauses, focusing on quartet music, soloing liberally and barely pausing for a minimal drum solo by Robert Gay. The title track is a rocked-out blues that presses the accelerator continuously. Jazz snobs certainly should avoid the funky music laid down here. Catalano plays bar-walking pleasers throughout. (I think Mr. Coltrane dipped his big toe into some of this pleasure early on too.)

If Catalano weren’t a major talent on the saxophone, this guilty pleasure of an album would call for a pass. But he tosses some smart blues improvisation within the honking on “Burner’s Blues,” and the funk lays heavy on “God’s Love For Music,” with some sizzling electric keyboard and bass backing. While the disco remix tacked onto the end is very forgettable—did somebody call for a 1970s soundtrack?—the live tracks are a jazz fan's guilty pleasure.